7 Flowers to Plant In March (& What Else To Do In Your Garden)

flowers to plant in march
Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Myriams-Fotos

What flowers should be planted in March? What blooms in March and early spring? Read these tips for your early spring garden.

Although March can still be quite cold and snowy, particularly up north, some plants and flowers can withstand the weather and are ideal to plant in early spring. Follow these tips to keep your garden blooming.

Flowers to Plant in March: The Top Seven

Both your planting zone and overall weather in early spring will determine which plants are viable to grow in March. For example, if you are in a colder zone/part of the globe, you should plant some of these flowers after the frost has lifted.

Here are seven flowers that can be planted in March. They are all native to the US and bee/insect-friendly to ensure your garden is a great place for pollinators.

1. Wild Columbine

The wild columbine has various types, including this, the sitka columbine.
The wild columbine has various types, including this, the sitka columbine.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / ArtTower)

These delicate drooping buds are hardier than they look. Plant wild columbine in partially-shaded to fully-shaded areas of your garden in zones 3-8 and watch the hummingbirds gather to your colorful garden. 

2. Woodland Phlox

Phlox plants have various hues of color and can cover vast areas,
Phlox plants have various hues of color and can cover vast areas,
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Sonja-Kalee)

Woodland phlox is a groundcover type of plant, which will bloom in various hues of blue and purple flowers and act as a beautiful cover for foliage. There are variations that prefer some shade and typically thrive in zones 3-8. These plants need draining soil and medium moisture, as well as partial to full shade. If you plant woodland phlox in early March, the flower has enough time to develop and bloom during April and May. 

3. Creeping Phlox

The Creeping Phlox will cover vast areas if allowed to grow unchecked.
The Creeping Phlox will cover vast areas if allowed to grow unchecked.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / auntmasako)

Similar to the woodland phlox, creeping phlox is also a groundcover plant that will attract various butterflies and other pollinators. It is more tolerant of sunshine and will thrive in fully sunlit areas of the garden in zones 3-8. 

4. Wild Pinks

Attract pollinators to your garden with these wild pinks.
Attract pollinators to your garden with these wild pinks.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Walter46)

Wild Pinks develop best when planted in spring months like March. These sturdy blooms will grow even in periods of drought and rain in full sun or shade and the colorful pinks attract butterflies and hummingbirds in zones 4-7. Wild pinks require dry to medium moisture levels, so water accordingly. 

5. Wine Cups

Winecups are a bloom that loves the sun.
Winecups are a bloom that loves the sun.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Lengyel_Art)

These full sun loving flowers are a groundcover bloom that attract butterflies and bees to your garden in zones 4-8. Wine cups are drought resistant, but should be regularly watered for the first growing season to establish the roots. 

6. Cleveland Sage

Plant Cleveland Sage to attract pollinators.
Plant Cleveland Sage to attract pollinators.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Buntysmum)

This full sun to partial shade blooms attract hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies to your garden in zones 7-11. You can also use Cleaveland sage for cooking. Young plants require about an inch of water per week, less if it rains. Afterwards, try to keep the soil moist but not waterlogged. If you want to start seeds outdoors, you can sow them directly in the ground in spring, as soon as there is no risk of frost anymore. Depending on what state you live in, you may be able to plant the flower a bit later or earlier than March. 

7. Silver Gem Violet

Similar to these violets but with silver foliage, silver gem violets are great pollinators.
Similar to these violets but with silver foliage, silver gem violets are great pollinators.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / Pezibear)

These blooms grow well in zones 5-8 in areas of partial shade/full shade and will attract insects, butterflies, birds, and caterpillars. They bloom for long periods and are drought resistant. The Silver Gem violet has silver foliage with burgundy undersides and blue/purple blooms. 

Bonus: 3 Shrubs to Plant in March

The distinctive red berries stand out amongst pastel flowers.
The distinctive red berries stand out amongst pastel flowers.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / dianaparkhouse)

While not quite delicate blooms, these pretty shrubs also make a great addition to an early spring garden.

  1. Rhododendrons: These native shrubs grow in variations across the plant zones and are highly adaptable to temperature changes. Many variations exist for differing zones and temperatures, and all are great for attracting bees and pollinators.
  2. Red Chokeberry: These native shrubs won’t show off their colors until fall, but are fine to plant in spring. They are tolerant to drought and need minimal upkeep in zones 4-9.
  3. Little Filly American Hazelnut: These partial sun plants grow well in zones 4-8 and attract various insects and butterflies once bloomed. The nuts also provide food for smaller animals.

Other March Gardening Ideas

March is also a good time to replant houseplants.
March is also a good time to replant houseplants.
(Foto: CC0 / Pixabay / KRiPPS_medien)

You can do a lot of planting/gardening in March with various other plants. Some examples include:

  • Plant annuals – plants that bloom in warmer weather can be planted in frost-free zones in March/early spring. Examples include: begonia or zinnias
  • Plant berries – some berries prefer a spring start, such as raspberries or strawberries.
  • Start veggies – seeds for vegetables that will grow in warmer weather can be planted in March, such as tomatoes and squash in warmer climates. In colder climates, peas, spinach and other cool vegetables can be planted in March.
  • Add trees/shrubs – trees and shrubs love moist weather of early spring, so March is a good time to plant them in your garden. Dig a hole wider than the ball of the plant, but that will allow the shrub to go in at the same height as its nursery pot, cover with mulch and water thoroughly.
  • Repot indoor plants – indoor plants that have weathered the winter may need to be pruned or repotted. Prune plants that are growing leggy, and repot plants with fresh soil into larger pots to stimulate growth for the spring.

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